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TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 1 of 12
Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME
PRODUCT USE
Redrawing or rolling into electrical conductors, wires and strips.
SUPPLIER
Company: Metal Manufactures Technical Services Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE
NON-HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. NON-DANGEROUS GOODS. According to NOHSC Criteria, and ADG Code.
CHEMWATCH HAZARD RATINGS
• Use only in well ventilated areas.
• Keep container in a well ventilated place.
• In case of contact with eyes, rinse with plenty of water and contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre.
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 2 of 12
Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
SWALLOWED
• For advice, contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.
• If swallowed do NOT induce vomiting.
• If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on left side (head-down position, if possible) to maintain open airway and prevent aspiration.
• Never give liquid to a person showing signs of being sleepy or with reduced awareness; i.e. becoming • Give water to rinse out mouth, then provide liquid slowly and as much as casualty can comfortably drink.
■ If this product comes in contact with the eyes: • Wash out immediately with fresh running water.
• Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
• Seek medical attention without delay; if pain persists or recurs seek medical attention.
• Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.
• Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
• Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
• If dust is inhaled, remove from contaminated area.
• Encourage patient to blow nose to ensure clear passage of breathing.
• If irritation or discomfort persists seek medical attention.
• If fumes or combustion products are inhaled remove from contaminated area.
• Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
• Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to • Apply artificial respiration if not breathing, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask device, or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
• Transport to hospital, or doctor, without delay.
NOTES TO PHYSICIAN
■ Copper, magnesium, aluminium, antimony, iron, manganese, nickel, zinc (and their compounds) in welding, brazing, galvanising or smelting operations all give rise to thermally produced particulates of smaller dimension than may be produced if the metals are divided mechanically. Where insufficient ventilation or respiratory protection is available these particulates may produce "metal fume fever" in workers from an • Onset occurs in 4-6 hours generally on the evening following exposure. Tolerance develops in workers but may be lost over the weekend. (Monday Morning Fever) • Pulmonary function tests may indicate reduced lung volumes, small airway obstruction and decreased carbon monoxide diffusing capacity but these abnormalities resolve after several months.
• Although mildly elevated urinary levels of heavy metal may occur they do not correlate with clinical • The general approach to treatment is recognition of the disease, supportive care and prevention of exposure.
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 3 of 12
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
• Seriously symptomatic patients should receive chest x-rays, have arterial blood gases determined and be observed for the development of tracheobronchitis and pulmonary edema.
[Ellenhorn and Barceloux: Medical Toxicology].
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA
■ Metal dust fires need to be smothered with sand, inert dry powders.
• Use DRY sand, graphite powder, dry sodium chloride based extinguishers, G-1 or Met L-X to smother fire.
• Confining or smothering material is preferable to applying water as chemical reaction may produce flammable • Chemical reaction with CO2 may produce flammable and explosive methane.
• If impossible to extinguish, withdraw, protect surroundings and allow fire to burn itself out.
FIRE FIGHTING
■ Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
• Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
• Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses.
Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
DO NOT approach containers suspected to be hot.
If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
Equipment should be thoroughly decontaminated after use.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD
• Metal powders, while generally regarded as non-combustible, may burn when metal is finely divided and • DO NOT use water or foam as generation of explosive hydrogen may result.
• May be ignited by friction, heat, sparks or flame.
• Metal dust fires are slow moving but intense and difficult to extinguish.
• DO NOT disturb burning dust. Explosion may result if dust is stirred into a cloud, by providing oxygen to a • Containers may explode on heating.
• Dusts or fumes may form explosive mixtures with air.
• May REIGNITE after fire is extinguished.
• Gases generated in fire may be poisonous, corrosive or irritating.
Personal Protective Equipment
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
MINOR SPILLS
• Clean up all spills immediately.
• Avoid contact with skin and eyes.
• Wear impervious gloves and safety glasses.
• Use dry clean up procedures and avoid generating dust.
• Vacuum up (consider explosion-proof machines designed to be grounded during storage and use).
• Place spilled material in clean, dry, sealable, labelled container.
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 4 of 12
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
MAJOR SPILLS
• Clean up all spills immediately.
• Bundle/collect recoverable product.
• Collect remaining material in containers with covers for disposal.
Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING
• Limit all unnecessary personal contact.
• Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
• When handling DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
• Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
• Avoid physical damage to containers.
• Use good occupational work practice.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
SUITABLE CONTAINER
Caution must be exercised when removing packing due to springback. Refer STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY
Copper is resistant to corrosion in dry air. Atmospheric moisture will cause surface corrosion after prolonged periods.
Avoid storage with acetylene, ammonium nitrate, bromates, chlorates, chlorine, chlorine plus oxygen difluoride, chlorine trifluoride, ethylene oxide, fluorine, hydrazine, mononitrate, hydrozoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen sulfide, iodates, lead azide, phosphorus, nitric acid, potassium peroxide, sodium azide, sodium peroxide, sulfur plus chlorates, STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
• Protect containers against physical damage.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
_____________________________________________________
SAFE STORAGE WITH OTHER CLASSIFIED CHEMICALS
_____________________________________________________
O: May be stored together with specific preventions continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 5 of 12
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
EXPOSURE CONTROLS
copper (Copper, dusts & mists (as Cu)) EMERGENCY EXPOSURE LIMITS
Material
MATERIAL DATA
TIN:■ It is the goal of the ACGIH (and other Agencies) to recommend TLVs (or their equivalent) for all substances for which there is evidence of health effects at airborne concentrations encountered in the At this time no TLV has been established, even though this material may produce adverse health effects (as evidenced in animal experiments or clinical experience). Airborne concentrations must be maintained as low as is practically possible and occupational exposure must be kept to a minimum.
NOTE: The ACGIH occupational exposure standard for Particles Not Otherwise Specified (P.N.O.S) does NOT A TLV-TWA is recommended so as to minimise the risk of stannosis. The STEL (4.0 mg/m3) has been eliminated (since 1986) so that additional toxicological data and industrial hygiene experience may become available to provide a better base for quantifying on a toxicological basis what the STEL should in fact be.
PERSONAL PROTECTION
• Safety glasses with side shields; or as required, • Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb and concentrate irritants. A written policy document, describing the wearing of lens or restrictions on use, should be created for each workplace or task. This should include a review of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of chemicals in use and an account of injury experience. Medical and first-aid personnel should be trained in their removal and suitable equipment should be readily available. In the event of chemical exposure, begin eye irrigation immediately and remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lens should be removed at the first signs of eye redness or irritation - lens should be removed in a clean environment only after workers continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 6 of 12
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
have washed hands thoroughly. [CDC NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 59], [AS/NZS 1336 or national HANDS/FEET
• Wear physical protective gloves, eg. leather.
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protective equipment required. For further information consult site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or your Occupational Health and Safety Advisor.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS
■ Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Well- designed engineering controls can be highly effective in protecting workers and will typically be independent of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are: Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Enclosure and/or isolation of emission source which keeps a selected hazard "physically" away from the worker and ventilation that strategically "adds" and "removes" air in the work environment. Ventilation can remove or dilute an air contaminant if designed properly. The design of a ventilation system must match the particular process and chemical or contaminant in use.
Employers may need to use multiple types of controls to prevent employee overexposure.
• Local exhaust ventilation is required where solids are handled as powders or crystals; even when particulates are relatively large, a certain proportion will be powdered by mutual friction.
• Exhaust ventilation should be designed to prevent accumulation and recirculation of particulates in the • If in spite of local exhaust an adverse concentration of the substance in air could occur, respiratory protection should be considered. Such protection might consist of: (a): particle dust respirators, if necessary, combined with an absorption cartridge; (b): filter respirators with absorption cartridge or canister of the right type; • Build-up of electrostatic charge on the dust particle, may be prevented by bonding and grounding.
• Powder handling equipment such as dust collectors, dryers and mills may require additional protection Air contaminants generated in the workplace possess varying "escape" velocities which, in turn, determine the "capture velocities" of fresh circulating air required to efficiently remove the contaminant.
direct spray, spray painting in shallow booths, drum filling, conveyer loading, crusher dusts, gas discharge (active generation into zone of grinding, abrasive blasting, tumbling, high speed wheel generated dusts (released at high initial velocity into zone of very high rapid Within each range the appropriate value depends on: continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 7 of 12
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
1: Room air currents minimal or favourable to 2: Contaminants of low toxicity or of nuisance 4: Large hood or large air mass in motion Simple theory shows that air velocity falls rapidly with distance away from the opening of a simple extraction pipe. Velocity generally decreases with the square of distance from the extraction point (in simple cases). Therefore the air speed at the extraction point should be adjusted, accordingly, after reference to distance from the contaminating source. The air velocity at the extraction fan, for example, should be a minimum of 4-10 m/s (800-2000 f/min) for extraction of crusher dusts generated 2 metres distant from the extraction point. Other mechanical considerations, producing performance deficits within the extraction apparatus, make it essential that theoretical air velocities are multiplied by factors of 10 or more when extraction systems are installed or used.
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
APPEARANCE
Odourless reddish yellow metal artice in form of bars, rods, billets or wire.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Section 10 - STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY
• Presence of incompatible materials.
• Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage. Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 8 of 12
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
SWALLOWED
■ Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
The material may be mildly discomforting to the gastro-intestinal tract if swallowed in large quantity.
■ Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
Particulate/dust is discomforting and abrasive to the eyes.
■ Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
Particulate/dust is discomforting and abrasive to the skin.
Exposure to copper, by skin, has come from its use in pigments, ointments, ornaments, jewellery, dental amalgams and IUDs (intra-uterine devices), and in killing fungi and algae. Although copper is used in the treatment of water in swimming pools and reservoirs, there are no reports of toxicity from these applications. Reports of allergic contact dermatitis following contact with copper and its salts have appeared in the literature, however the exposure concentrations leading to any effect have been poorly characterized. In studies, the possible contamination with nickel (which causes allergies definitely) has been raised as a reason for any reactions observed.
■ Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
The dust may be discomforting to the upper respiratory tract.
Persons with impaired respiratory function, airway diseases and conditions such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis, may incur further disability if excessive concentrations of particulate are inhaled.
If prior damage to the circulatory or nervous systems has occurred or if kidney damage has been sustained, proper screenings should be conducted on individuals who may be exposed to further risk if handling and use Copper poisoning following exposure to copper dusts and fume may result in headache, cold sweat and weak pulse. Capillary, kidney, liver and brain damage are the longer term manifestations of such poisoning.
Inhalation of freshly formed metal oxide particles sized below 1.5 microns and generally between 0.02 to 0.05 microns may result in "metal fume fever". Symptoms may be delayed for up to 12 hours and begin with the sudden onset of thirst, and a sweet, metallic or foul taste in the mouth. Other symptoms include upper respiratory tract irritation accompanied by coughing and a dryness of the mucous membranes, lassitude and a generalised feeling of malaise. Mild to severe headache, nausea, occasional vomiting, fever or chills, exaggerated mental activity, profuse sweating, diarrhoea, excessive urination and prostration may also occur.
Tolerance to the fumes develops rapidly, but is quickly lost. All symptoms usually subside within 24-36 hours CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS
■ Principal routes of exposure are by accidental skin and eye contact and inhalation of generated dusts.
Copper has fairly low toxicity. Some rare hereditary conditions (Wilson disease or hepatolenticular degeneration) can lead to accumulation of copper on exposure, causing irreversible damage to a variety of organs (liver, kidney, CNS, bone, vision) and lead to death. There may be anaemia and cirrhosis of the liver.
TOXICITY AND IRRITATION
■ Not available. Refer to individual constituents.
■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
WARNING: Inhalation of high concentrations of copper fume may cause " fume fever", an acute industrial disease of short duration. Symptoms are tiredness, influenza like respiratory tract irritation with fever.
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 9 of 12
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
■ No significant acute toxicological data identified in literature search.
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
■ DO NOT discharge into sewer or waterways.
Copper is unlikely to accumulate in the atmosphere due to a short residence time for airborne copper aerosols. Airborne coppers, however, may be transported over large distances. Copper accumulates 1000 ug/l (WHO level where individuals complain) Air Quality Standards: no data available.
The toxic effect of copper in the aquatic biota depends on the bio-availability of copper in water which, in turn, depends on its physico-chemical form (ie.speciation). Bioavailability is decreased by complexation and adsorption of copper by natural organic matter, iron and manganese hydrated oxides, and chelating agents excreted by algae and other aquatic organisms. Toxicity is also affected by pH and hardness. Total copper is rarely useful as a predictor of toxicity. In natural sea water, more than 98% of copper is organically bound and in river waters a high percentage is often organically bound, but the actual percentage depends on the Copper exhibits significant toxicity in some aquatic organisms. Some algal species are very sensitive to copper with EC50 (96 hour) values as low as 47 ug/litre dissolved copper whilst for other algal species EC50 values of up to 481 ug/litre have been reported. However many of the reportedly high EC50 values may arise in experiments conducted with a culture media containing copper-complexing agents such as silicate, iron, manganese and EDTA which reduce bioavailability.
Toxic effects arising following exposure by aquatic species to copper are typically: Daphnia magna LC50 Amphipods LC50 (48- Gastropods LC50 Exposure to concentrations ranging from one to a few hundred micrograms per litre has led to sublethal effects and effects on long-term survival. For high bioavailability waters, effect concentrations for several sensitive species may be below 10 ug Cu/litre.
In fish, the acute lethal concentration of copper ranges from a few ug/litre to several mg/litre, depending both on test species and exposure conditions. Where the value is less than 50 ug Cu/litre, test waters generally have a low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) level, low hardness and neutral to slightly acidic pH.
Exposure to concentrations ranging from one to a few hundred micrograms per litre has led to sublethal effects and effects on long-term survival. Lower effect concentrations are generally associated with test continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 10 of 12
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Responses expected for high concentration ranges of copper * Significant effects are expected for diatoms significant in freshwaters with low pH and Significant effects are expected on various macroalgae, and a range of invertebrates, including crustaceans, gastropods and sea urchins. Survival of sensitive fish will be affected and a variety of fish show sublethal invertebrates will be severely affected. Lethal levels for most fish species will be reached.
* Sites chosen have moderate to high bioavailability similar to water used in most toxicity tests.
In soil, copper levels are raised by application of fertiliser, fungicides, from deposition of highway dusts and from urban, mining and industrial sources. Generally, vegetation rooted in soils reflects the soil copper levels in its foliage. This is dependent upon the bioavailability of copper and the physiological Plants rarely show symptoms of toxicity or of adverse growth effects at normal soil concentrations of copper.
Crops are often more sensitive to copper than the native flora, so protection levels for agricultural crops range from 25 mg Cu/kg to several hundred mg/kg, depending on country. Chronic and or acute effects on sensitive species occur at copper levels occurring in some soils as a result of human activities such as copper fertiliser addition, and addition of sludge.
When soil levels exceed 150 mg Cu/kg, native and agricultural species show chronic effects. Soils in the range 500-1000 mg Cu/kg act in a strongly selective fashion allowing the survival of only copper-tolerant species and strains. At 2000 Cu mg/kg most species cannot survive. By 3500 mg Cu/kg areas are largely devoid of vegetation cover. The organic content of the soil appears to be a key factor affecting the bioavailability On normal forest soils, non-rooted plants such as mosses and lichens show higher copper concentrations. The fruiting bodies and mycorrhizal sheaths of soil fungi associated with higher plants in forests often accumulate copper to much higher levels than plants at the same site. International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): Environmental Health Criteria 200.
The material is classified as an ecotoxin* because the Fish LC50 (96 hours) is less than or equal to 0.1 mg/l * Classification of Substances as Ecotoxic (Dangerous to the Environment) Compiler's Guide for the Preparation of International Chemical Safety Cards: 1993 Commission of the European continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 11 of 12
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
■ Metal-containing inorganic substances generally have negligible vapour pressure and are not expected to partition to air. Once released to surface waters and moist soils their fate depends on solubility and dissociation in water. Environmental processes (such as oxidation and the presence of acids or bases) may transform insoluble metals to more soluble ionic forms. Microbiological processes may also transform insoluble metals to more soluble forms. Such ionic species may bind to dissolved ligands or sorb to solid particles in aquatic or aqueous media. A significant proportion of dissolved/ sorbed metals will end up in sediments through the settling of suspended particles. The remaining metal ions can then be taken up by When released to dry soil most metals will exhibit limited mobility and remain in the upper layer; some will leach locally into ground water and/ or surface water ecosystems when soaked by rain or melt ice.
Environmental processes may also be important in changing solubilities.
Even though many metals show few toxic effects at physiological pHs, transformation may introduce new or A metal ion is considered infinitely persistent because it cannot degrade further.
The current state of science does not allow for an unambiguous interpretation of various measures of The counter-ion may also create heath and environmental concerns once isolated from the metal. Under normal physiological conditions the counter-ion may be essentially insoluble and may not be bioavailable.
Environmental processes may enhance bioavailability.
Tin may exist in either divalent (Sn2+) or tetravalent (Sn4+) cationic (positively charged) ions under environmental conditions. Tin(II) dominates in reduced (oxygen-poor) water, and will readily precipitate as a sulfide (SnS) or as a hydroxide (Sn(OH)2) in alkaline water. Tin(IV) readily hydrolyses, and can precipitate as a hydroxide. The solubility product of Sn(OH)4 has been measured at approximately 10 exp(-56) g/L at 25 °C. In general, tin(IV) would be expected to be the only stable ionic species in the weathering cycle.
Tin in water may partition to soils and sediments. Cations such as Sn2+ and Sn4+ will generally be adsorbed by soils to some extent, which reduces their mobility. Tin is generally regarded as being relatively immobile in the environment. However, tin may be transported in water if it partitions to suspended sediments, but the significance of this mechanism has not been studied in detail. Transfer coefficients for tin in a soil-plant system were reported to be 0.01-0.1.
A bioconcentration factor (BCF) relates the concentration of a chemical in plants and animals to the concentration of the chemical in the medium in which they live. It was estimated that the BCFs of inorganic tin were 100, 1,000, and 3,000 for marine and freshwater plants, invertebrates, and fish, respectively.
Marine algae can bioconcentrate tin(IV) ion by a factor of 1,900.
Inorganic tin cannot be degraded in the environment, but may undergo oxidation-reduction, ligand exchange, and precipitation reactions. It has been established that inorganic tin can be transformed into organometallic forms by microbial methylation . Inorganic tin may also be converted to stannane (H4Sn) in extremely anaerobic (oxygen-poor) conditions by macroalgae.
Ecotoxicity
Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
continued.
TIN BEARING COPPER
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2011
CHEMWATCH 4668-73
NC317TCP
Version No:3
CD 2011/3 Page 12 of 12
Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
HAZCHEM:
NOT REGULATED FOR TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS: ADG7, UN, IATA, IMDG Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
REGULATIONS
Regulations for ingredients
copper (CAS: 7440-50-8) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (AQUA/1 to 6 - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (Domestic water supply - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (IRRIG - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (STOCK - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Aquatic habitat)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Domestic water supply quality)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (IRRIG)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory Environment Protection Regulation Pollutants entering waterways - Agricultural uses (Stock)","Australia ADI list - Acceptable daily intakes for agricultural and veterinary chemicals","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","International Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG Code) - Marine Pollutants","International Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG Code) - Substance Index","WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Guideline values for chemicals that are of health tin (CAS: 7440-31-5) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia - Western Australia Hazardous Substances Prohibited for Specified Uses or Methods of Handling","Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Chemicals for which guideline values have not been established" No data for Tin Bearing Copper (CW: 4668-73)
Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
■ Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at: ■ The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review or criticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700.

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